For the Ancient Egyptians the daily path of the sun-god dictated the course of life, and as the sun ‘died’ every day in the western horizon, to be reborn the next morning in the east, so the west, and specifically the desert west of the Nile, became the destination of the dead, and the entrance to the mysterious Netherworld.

Join authors Gavin Athienides and Ted Loukes on a voyage of discovery to the ancient city of Thebes, one-time capital of the land of the Pharaohs, and the extraordinary burial grounds of Ancient Egypt’s New Kingdom. Pooling their knowledge, resources and personal experiences, Gavin and Ted will lead you on a fascinating exploration back in time, following in the footsteps of the great pioneer Egyptologists who opened up the sprawling necropolis of Ancient Thebes.

With an itinerary that takes in the finest tombs and temples, we will walk the paths of not just kings and queens from the distant past, but also those of the nobility of the age, the men and women who held the reins of officialdom in the name of the Pharaoh, and the oft-forgotten workmen who laboured under extreme conditions to bring these massive undertakings to life.

Your Hosts

Gavin Athienides

Ted Loukes

 

Gavin Athienides, current vice-chairman of the Ancient Egyptian Society in South Africa, found himself in Egypt looking for content for a children’s book he was writing, titled “The Adventures of Tee, Timothy and Tiger”, a story of two friends and their amazing escapades with a real-life Egyptian mummy.  

The Adventures of Tee, Timothy and Tiger

Since that time the stories of the more modern explorers and their adventures rediscovering Egypt, particularly in the Valley of the Kings, have captured his interests, and feature heavily in the theme of the current tour being offered.

Gavin with Dr Otto Schaden

Gavin with Dr Otto Schaden

Ted Loukes is an independent researcher in the field of ancient civilisations. He has been on a voyage of discovery for over forty years, questioning man’s origins by digging through ancient texts and inscriptions, myths and legends. 

His particular fascination with Ancient Egypt began in 1972 with a visit to the Treasures of Tutankhamun exhibition, held at the British Museum. His non-fiction work “Moses and Akhenaten: Brothers in Alms” grew from a single page blog post to a three year project that incorporated several field trips to Egypt, notably to Luxor, with its rich history of what is known as the New Kingdom.

Read more at www.tedloukes.com 

Moses and Akhenaten: Brothers in Alms
Ted with Dr Zahi Hawass

Ted with Dr Zahi Hawass